Emergency Kitchen Substitutions

Emergency Kitchen Substitutions


Copyright Deborah Taylor-Hough


Used with permission. All rights reserved.

Do you ever find yourself all geared up and ready to make a favorite recipe ... but then discover you're staring at an empty container of a needed ingredient? Ugh. You don't want to run out to the store right now. So what do you do?

Well, that's when emergency kitchen substitutions come in handy. I've printed out the following list and keep a copy taped to the inside of my pantry door at all times.

Although these substitutions will work in a pinch, I don't recommend always substituting ingredients in your recipes. The recipes will technically work with substitutions, but often the finished product won't be exactly the same as when you use the original ingredients called for in the recipe. Also, be sure you don't make more than one substitution in a particular recipe at once. The more ingredients you substitute, the more "off" your product will be when you're finished.

EMERGENCY SUBSTITUTIONS

For: 1 Tbsp fresh herb

Use: 1/3 to 1/2 tsp dried herb (of the same kind)

For: 1 clove garlic

Use: 1/8 tsp garlic powder

For: 1 egg in baking

Use: 1 tsp cornstarch plus 1/4 cup water

For: 1 whole egg

Use: 2 egg yolks plus 1 Tbsp water

For: 1 cup whole fresh milk

Use: 1/2 cup evaporated milk plus 1/2 cup water, or 1/3 cup dry milk plus 1 cup water

For: 1 cup buttermilk

Use: 1 cup plain yogurt, or 1 cup sour milk (4 tsp white vinegar or lemon juice plus milk to make 1 cup -- let sit for five minutes before using)

For: 1 cup sour cream (in baking)

Use: 7/8 cup buttermilk or sour milk plus 3 Tbsp butter

For: 1 cup sour cream (in salad dressings, casseroles)

Use: 1 cup plain yogurt or 3/4 cup sour milk plus 1/3 cup butter

For: 1 cup cream

Use: 1/3 cup butter plus 3/4 cup milk

For: 1 cup corn syrup

Use: 2/3 cup granulated sugar plus 1/3 cup water

For: 1 cup brown sugar

Use: 1 cup granulated sugar plus 2 Tbsp molasses

For: 1 3/4 cup confectioners sugar

Use: 1 cup granulated sugar, packed

For: 1 cup margarine or butter (in baking or cooking)

Use: 1 cup hard shortening or 7/8 cup vegetable oil

For: 1 square unsweetened chocolate

Use: 3 Tbsp cocoa plus 1 Tbsp oil

For: 1 ounce semi-sweet chocolate

Use: 1 ounce unsweetened chocolate plus 4 tsp sugar

For: 3/4 cup cracker crumbs

Use: 1 cup bread crumbs

For: 1 cup cake flour, sifted

Use: 7/8 cup all purpose flour, sifted (1 cup minus 2 Tbsp)

For: 1 tsp baking powder

Use: 1/3 tsp baking soda plus 1/2 tsp cream of tarter,

or 1/4 tsp baking soda plus 1/3 cup sour milk

For: 1 Tbsp cornstarch for thickening

Use: 2 Tbsp flour

For: 1 Tbsp flour for thickening

Use: 1 1/2 tsp corn flour, arrowroot, potato flour, or rice flour; or 2 tsp tapioca

For: 2 Tbsp tapioca for thickening

Use: 3 Tbsp flour

About the Author

Deborah Taylor-Hough (wife and mother of three) is the author of the bestselling book, 'Frozen Assets: How to cook for a day and eat for a month' and the new book, 'Frugal Living For Dummies(r)' (Wiley, 2003). You can subscribe to her newest free newsletter by Clicking Here to send an email. Visit Debi's Website


 
 
 

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