Decorating for Autumn

Decorating for Autumn
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harvestAutumn is such a fun time of year to decorate with the rich color schemes. Natural elements fit in nicely with the rustic fall colors, so there are many ways you can inexpensively decorate for the season.

Instead of using your glue gun to make seasonal decor consider buying grapevine forms-wreaths in different shapes and small swags, then use ribbon and seasonal picks that you weave in and out of the grapevine, rather than gluing. You can then remove and replace these for the new seasons. You won't end up having to store the wreaths or wall decorations, instead just keep the small items in a shoebox size plastic tub for each season and switch them as each holiday approaches. When they start to look worn, you can always give them to the kids to try their hand at making their own seasonal decor!

Gather pinecones, seedpods, acorns and fall leaves to put in wicker baskets. Use these on the porch or in entry ways for simple, rustic decorations. You can also use small branches with the pinecones and/or leaves still attached and place them in vases and crocks.

Potted mums this time of year are the same prices as cut flowers, or cheaper, so why not buy several, pot them up and place them around your walks, steps and porch. Tie autumn themed ribbons around the base of the pots. If you have room plant them in the ground after the blooms are gone and lay down some mulch (grass clippings or chopped leaves) for the winter.

Go for a rustic but yet dramatic look by placing a large grapevine wreath in an empty space such as the peak of the garage or the house. You don't need a bow for fall, and at Christmas you can attach a large red bow. It's simple, but adds so much!

Pumpkins and Gourds Galore! Put them everywhere. Try to find a grower or farm market instead of buying them at the garden center or store. You'll find some great buys on the "less" than perfect ones, but they are still great for decorating. We buy small and medium sized pumpkins for .50 and 1.00 each year. Grandpa always grows a biggie for the kids too! Put your gourds and pumpkins in groups...place some on upside down pots to raise them up to different levels in a grouping. Mix a mum or two in with them, and tie a few bows all around!

Winter Squash--Look for Hubbard and Turban squash. They have an interesting texture and a neat look to them. Decorate the porch, but don't allow them to freeze, and afterwards you can eat them for Sunday and holiday dinners! Group them in a large wicker basket.

Garland-Make a garland of smaller gourds with the long necks and Indian corn still in the husk. Use jute or twine and alternate between corn and the gourds. Measure a section of your porch. I have arches and hang garlands in each one. In the middle of the garland make a bow from raffia and pieces of torn rust or orange colored fabric. You can also hang the garland from a porch or deck railing.

Rustic Scarecrow: Instead of stuffing clothing, take two pieces of scrap wood and nail together a cross formation. Take a piece of muslin and place it over the top piece of wood-tie it at the "neck" and draw on a face with a waterproof marker. Dress your wooden friend in clothing, a hat and you can even put hooks on the end of each "arm" and hang buckets of flowers, a birdhouse or other fun items. Turn your scarecrow into a country lady by dressing her in woman's clothing and giving her a gardening hat, gloves, and small garden tools. The great thing with this is that you literally can use scrap wood and old clothing, and go wild with your imagination!

Tin Can Fun: Save those cans! Prime them and go to town painting them in fun fall colors. You can plant mums in the larger coffee type cans and in the others place wildflowers, dried grasses and branches to decorate outside.

Milk Cans: If you have any old worn rakes, shovels and other lawn tools laying around, put them to a decorative use. Place a couple of cornstalks in an old metal milk can, behind the tools, and tie a big fall themed bow around the milk can! You can do this with a large bucket or basket too.

 

Image: FreeDigitalPhotos.net

About the author

Brenda is a wife and mom living with her family in the Midwest United States. She is also a freelance writer and the editor of Old Fashioned Living.

 

About The Author

Brenda Hyde is a freelance writer living on ten acres in rural Michigan with her husband and three kids. She is a mom, grandma, gardener, cook and writer. She blogs on all of these topics at Harvestmoongazette.blogspot.com.

 
 

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